Britain’s last anti-Jewish riots

Why have the 1947 riots been forgotten?

In 1947 a washed-out summer had followed a harsh winter, and Britain was in the grip of recession as it struggled to restart its economy after the Second World War. On the August bank holiday weekend, the weather in Manchester had turned hot and stuffy. Trade in the shops was poor, rationing was in full swing and many workers had opted to stay in the city for the long weekend.

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Mao’s Jews

On Oct. 1, 1967, China’s National Day, Sidney Rittenberg had reached the pinnacle of his revolutionary career. It was the 18th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China, and Rittenberg was seated on a reviewing stand less than fifty feet from Mao Zedong, overlooking a sea of thousands who had crowded into Tiananmen Square to mark the occasion.

Rittenberg was one of the very few foreign nationals who had remained in China after the communists came to power in 1949 and one of an even smaller number who had managed to work their way into Mao’s inner circle, serving the communist leadership as valued advisers, trusted emissaries and even revolutionary leaders.

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Poland Turns Tables on Jews in Holocaust Debate

Jews are fuming at Poland after its right-wing government put forward a law that aims to criminalize assertions that Poland was in  any way culpable in the Holocaust. Those claims have been disseminated largely by Jewish historians and leaders over the years seeking to guilt trip Europeans more generally, and Poles in particular, for the fate of their brethren in World War II. Will we now see top Jews arrested and fined for inferring Polish guilt?

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His Greatest Blunder : Hitler ‘stopped advancing on British troops at Dunkirk for a PEACE treaty’ author claims

Author Stephen Davis while researching the Second World War for his latest novel, I Spy The Wolf, claims he may have uncovered the reason why Hitler infamously and mysteriously stopped advancing his troops at Dunkirk – a decision some say was a crucial break for the Allied Forces.

On May 24, 1940, the German army appeared to winning the war as Allied Forces were surrounded by land at Dunkirk.

But instead of continuing the invasion, Hitler ordered his army to halt for three days, a decision that has puzzled historians for over 70 years.

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Enoch Powell’s Britain: What If?

Enoch Powell is often described as the greatest Prime Minister we never had. That is to say or imply, undoubtedly, that had he been Prime Minister of the United Kingdom he would have surpassed even Winston Churchill in the minds of those debating the greatest Briton of the 20th century. Yet outside the realms of the obvious, many still find it difficult to define ‘Powellism’, and therefore what a Britain led by Mr Powell would have looked like. Some on the right wrongly claim that he represented a more conservative strand of Thatcherism, whilst his detractors on the left claim – also wrongly – that Powell’s brand of politics was more akin to the fascists and Oswald Mosley.

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