You’ll finally be able to see Jerry Lewis’ #Holohoax film — in 2024

A bombshell for Jerry Lewis fans and other cinephiles was buried in a Los Angeles Times feature story last week — he’s donated his legendarily-unseen Holocaust concentration-camp movie to the Library of Congress.

Now film archivists at the library have exclusively provided details on their prize acquisition to The Post, including why Lewis backed down from his longtime opposition to showing “The Day the Clown Cried,’’ and precisely when and where that will happen. It won’t be until June 2024, and it won’t be easy unless you happen to live in or near Northern Virginia.

Here

Dunkirk : Movie Review


It is amazing how this stinking movie genre of World War II lies, which started with The Great Dictator in 1940, is still going strong after 77 years! Boy oh boy, evidently The Great One (that’s Hitler for all youse newbies and normies) must have really shaken the New World Order gang to its rotten Satanic core.
Though we just cannot bring ourselves to the theater and subject our volatile emotions to two hours of fraudulent filth on the big screen, based on reviewing several extended You Tube trailers, and in light of the fact that a “historian” named Joshua Levine (cough cough) was hired to help develop the script, we already know the oh-so-predictable historical spin of the Dunkirk “escape” that this propaganda film will surely present. Let us debunk the lasting lie about “the miracle at Dunkirk.”
Sandwiched around our explanation of why the British were able to so easily “escape” at Dunkirk, are critical bits of before and after historical context, excerpted from “The Bad War: The Truth Never Taught About World War II.”

Here

Starting in 2019, if Your Film Isn’t Diverse, It Won’t Be Eligible for a BAFTA Award

 
In an incredibly bold move, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts announced last week that, beginning in 2019, works that do not demonstrate inclusivity in their production practices will no longer be eligible for the Outstanding British Film or Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director, or Producer awards at the annual BAFTAs, often considered the U.K. equivalent of the Oscars.* Eligible projects must showcase this in two of the following ways, as the BBC reported: On-screen characters and themes, senior roles and crew, industry training and career progression, and audience access and appeal to underrepresented audiences. BAFTA will also remove the requirement that newly admitted voters be recommended by two existing members.

Continued – 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2016/12/19/the_bafta_awards_will_exclude_films_that_are_not_diverse_starting_in_2019.html